Tag Archives: basketball

Washington Generals

The Washington Generals were an American basketball team with the longest losing streak in sports history. They lost 2,495 consecutive games. Don’t feel too bad for them though. It was by design. The Washington Generals were the stooge basketball team that competes against the Harlem Globetrotters in exhibition games. They were supposed to lose. They stood around and acted confused when the Globetrotters play their flashy brand of fake basketball. The Washington Generals have gone by many other names at different times to make it seems like the Globetrotters are playing more than one team, but it was the same players with different jerseys. I’m speaking in the past tense about them because the Globetrotters severed the contract between the two teams in August of 2015 and the Washington Generals no longer exist. I feel bad for them. Sure, their players got paid to play professional basketball, but they were always a sham team. Their only point of existence was to make the Globetrotters look better. The Globetrotters found a new fake opponent to pretend to compete against and the Generals are just a thing of the past now. The world didn’t even notice. Nobody cared. They still don’t.

Critically Rated at 4/17

Written, Rated, and Reviewed by Brendan H. Young

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Filed under People I Feel Sorry For

Linsanity (documentary)

Linsanity is a 2013 documentary about NBA player Jeremy Lin and his rise to international stardom. Director Evan Jackson Leong and narrator Daniel Dae Kim tell the story one of the most famous athletes in the world, a spectacular feat considering he’s not that great of a player and barely managed to eke his way into the NBA. Everybody loves inspirational sports stories like Rudy, but Lin’s journey was way more impressive. Lin was one of the best high school players in California, but he was hardly recruited by any colleges because he didn’t fit the mold. By not fitting the mold, I mean that nobody wanted him because he’s Asian. He didn’t get any athletic scholarships and ended up going to Harvard because he would have a place on the team. He went undrafted after college, but eventually signed with the Golden State Warriors. He didn’t get much playing time and they waived him at the end of the season. The Houston Rockets picked him up and they waived him too. He managed to get a gig with the New York Knicks but he still wasn’t getting a chance to play.

The Knicks were in a bit of a slump and they decided to mix things up a bit by giving Lin some playing time. He took advantage and had twenty-five points, seven assists, and five rebounds in thirty-six minutes. That was enough to grant him a start the next game and he dominated again. Then he dominated the game after that. And the game after that. All in all, he had a nine game stretch where he averaged twenty-five points and nine assists in thirty-nine minutes per game. He became a superstar virtually overnight. Something special was happening and everyone wanted to be a part of it. It could only be described as Linsanity.

Linsanity takes you back to Jeremy’s childhood, how he inherited his love for the game from his father, the bond he shares with his brothers, and his dislike for playing piano. They stress his values in life are religion, family, and basketball (in that order). The filmmakers also show you Lin’s impact on the Asian community. He became a role model, albeit somewhat reluctantly. Jeremy Lin is not a great basketball player, but he is capable of great things. He inspired the world for fifteen days in February of 2012 and etched himself into our collective memory. Relive Linsanity with Linsanity. I watched it on Netflix. You should too.

Critically Rated at 14/17

Written, Rated, and Reviewed by Brendan H. Young

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Once Brothers (documentary)

Once Brothers is an ESPN 30 for 30 documentary about Vlade Divac and Dražen Petrović, two basketball players from Yugoslavia that were among the first Europeans to break into the NBA. They were close friends and teammates playing together on the Yugoslavia national basketball team. The film follows Vlade Divac’s journey of making the national basketball team, his friendship with star player Dražen Petrović, and their transition into the NBA. But then the Yugoslav war tears the two apart. If you paid attention in school, you might recall that the Yugoslav Wars, in which Yugoslavia broke up into different countries due to massive ethnic conflicts between different reasons. Vlade was from Serbia, Dražen was from Croatia, and that’s not a good mix. Plus one time Vlade disrespected the Croatian flag, and that pretty much ended their friendship. And they never got to make amends because Dražen went and got himself killed in a car accident. This is a great documentary about how politics, the real world, and sports impact each other. It makes you appreciate the past, but you can’t help but wonder what could have been.

Critically Rated at 14/17

Written, Rated, and Reviewed by Brendan H. Young

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Filed under Entertainment

Blacks and Asians

Have you ever noticed how much blacks and Asians have in common? They respect each other’s culture and even attempt to assimilate some cultural aspects. If you pay attention to pop culture, you’ll notice that blacks and Asians borrow from each other all the time. Case in point, the Wu-Tang Clan. They were heavily influenced by martial arts films and their debut album’s theme is about Shaolin style versus Wu-Tang style. RZA even did the music for Kill Bill. Blacks and Asians also share an affinity for Jackie Chan, but everybody loves Jackie Chan so I’m not sure that counts. They both love rap music and basketball and can dance way better than any white guy. A huge percentage of rappers and R&B singers use Chinese dragons and Kung Fu films as a motif in their music. There are an absurd amount of movies and TV shows about black ninjas/samurais/karate masters. Blade, Ghost Dog, Afro Samurai, etc. And we even have a bunch of martial arts films where a black person teams up with an Asian, like in the Rush Hour trilogy, Romeo Must Die… there are other examples but I’m too lazy to Google them. Asians are also the only race that blacks will allow to dress up like gangstas. It’s a compromise. If two cultures are constantly oppressed by Whitey, it’s only natural to form an alliance.

Critically Rated at 14/17

Written, Rated, and Reviewed by Brendan H. Young

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Filed under Random Rants

Watching the Game at the Bar

All across America and around the world people pack themselves into bars and pubs to watch their teams compete. Watching the game at the bar is more social, but it’s also more expensive than watching at home. It’s cool that you get to cheer and celebrate with other fans and you can discuss strategy and how bad the officials are. But you have to buy beer and food and you have to tip and that adds up. You have to deal with shit talkers and fair-weather fans who don’t know when to cheer. And there’s always a line for the bathroom. Watching the game at the bar is a ritual for some people and they like it. Some people don’t have any other place to watch it other than the bar so they have to suck it up and deal with it. No matter which camp you’re in, at least everyone in the bar can agree that watching sports and alcohol go hand in hand.

Critically Rated at 10/17

Written, Rated, and Reviewed by Brendan H. Young

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Filed under Drinks