Tag Archives: comic book character

Deadpool Kills the Marvel Universe (comic)

Deadpool Kills the Marvel Universe is limited series about Deadpool killing the Marvel Universe. Deadpool has always been a self-aware comic book character. He knows that he’s a character in a comic. He knows that his life is scripted, and he knows that everyone and everything around him is in the comic too. And so he decides to go against the status quo and he fights back against his creators by killing as many Marvel characters as he can. He kills Spider-man. He kills the Hulk. He kills the Fantastic Four. You might think that I’m giving you spoilers, but fuck you. It’s called Deadpool Kills the Marvel Universe! What the fuck did you think was going to happen?

Deadpool breaks the fourth wall and talks to the reader directly. It used to be funny. But it’s kind of disturbing when he starts threatening to hunt you down. Yeah, I know that he’s a comic book character. But he knows he is too, and Deadpool is crazy enough to make good on that threat. All in all, this is a great comic book, and a shining showcase of who Deadpool is. You should read it if you get the chance.

Critically Rated at 15/17

Written, Rated, and Reviewed by Brendan H. Young

Leave a comment

Filed under Entertainment

Deadpool Killustrated (comic)

One of the more interesting things about Deadpool is that he’s aware that he’s a comic book character. There’s a famous storyline where he goes on a rampage and destroys the Marvel Universe and enters the real world to confront the comic book writers and artists who created him. So what’s the next step after that? Well, have Deadpool kill the some of the most iconic character of classic literature of course.

The logic behind Deadpool’s thinking is that he can’t really destroy Marvel characters without first destroying the classic characters who inspired them. And so Moby Dick, Captain Ahab, Ishmael, Don Quixote, Sancho Panza, Tom Sawyer, Dracula, the Headless Horseman, the Little Women, Ebenezer Scrooge, Dr. Frankenstein, Mowgli, the Little Mermaid, the Three Musketeers, and a bunch more need to watch their backs because the Merc with the Mouth is coming for them.

This is a pretty interesting comic. It’s funny, it’s violent, and it’s smart. It reminds me of Alan Moore’s The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, but amped up and more extreme like it’s been drinking Mountain Dew. You don’t have to know anything about Deadpool to enjoy this comic. You can just pick it up and read it.

Critically Rated at 13/17

Written, Rated, and Reviewed by Brendan H. Young

Leave a comment

Filed under Entertainment

Superman: Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow? (comic)

Superman is the most important comic book character of all time. He basically launched the comics industry and became a global phenomenon. He transcends the page; he’s an icon, a symbol. But how does his story end? Well, we got to find out back in 1986 when DC decided to simplify things and get rid of the multiverse and reboot their history. They brought in Alan Moore to write Superman’s final adventure of the Silver Age and bring his story to a close. Moore uses a framing device with a reporter interviewing an older Lois Lane about the last time she saw Superman, who has been missing for ten years and assumed dead. The story flashes back to Superman’s final days. Most of his major foes have been defeated and are out of the picture. But then they start coming back, and they are more twisted than ever before. They discover his secret identity and start attacking the people that Clark cares about most, some of them even die. Superman must find a way to save the day, and he does (cause he’s fucking Superman) but he pays the ultimate price.

            Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow? is one of the most important comics in Superman’s long history. It’s a good read for casual fans and it’s essential reading for comic nerds. There’s a trade paperback that contains both Superman #423 and Action Comics #583, and as a bonus they throw in two more standalone stories. The Jungle Line is about Superman suffering from a strange Kryptonian flu and getting saved by the Swamp Thing. And there’s another one called For the Man Who Has Everything, which is Superman’s “what if” story showing what his life on Krypton would have been like if it never blew up.

            So if you ever wondered how the saga of Superman would end, this is the story for you. It has This is Alan Moore at the top of his game working on a Superman story to end all Superman stories. It has great artwork too. Curt Swan’s sketches are brought to life by inkers George Pérez and Kurt Schaffenberger. My biggest complaint is that it’s too short. You start reading and it and BAM! It’s over and you were just getting into it. You don’t want it to end, and then it’s over before you know it. But it sticks with you. It’s a great way to say good-bye to Superman. Even though he never really went away… you know there’s a new Superman movie coming out?

Critically Rated at 15/17

Written, Rated, and Reviewed by Brendan H. Young

Leave a comment

Filed under Entertainment

Daredevil: Born Again (comic)

Daredevil is an implausible comic book character. It’s has a ludicrous premise: a blind lawyer who uses his heightened senses to fight crime. But when put in the hands of a creative genius like Frank Miller, Daredevil becomes an icon like Batman or Spider-man. Frank Miller’s writing and Dave Mazzucchelli’s artwork are the perfect combination to depict one of the darkest stories in Marvel’s history.

            Daredevil’s ex-girlfriend is a heroin addict and sells his secret identity for a fix. Ultimately the information ends up in the hands of Daredevil’s arch nemisis, the Kingpin. The Kingpin lays out a plan to break Daredevil by destroying Matt Murdock’s life. Matt loses his apartment, the IRS freezes his bank accounts, he gets framed for perjury, he loses his girlfriend to his best friend, and he loses his good name. His life is crumbling around him and he breaks down mentally and physically. Superheroes are supposed to be invincible, so it’s fascinating to see them struggle.

            Born Again is a great comic, and Daredevil is a great comic book character. He belongs on the page, not on the big screen. Forget about Ben Affleck and read some off Frank Miller’s Daredevil comics. You can’t recreate his inner turmoil on film. It doesn’t translate.

Critically Rated at 15/17

Written, Rated, and Reviewed by Brendan H. Young

Leave a comment

Filed under Entertainment

Batman: Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader? (comic)

Neil Gaiman is a great writer and he knows how to write comic books. Batman is one of the best comic book characters of all time. And when you combine a great comic book writer with a great comic book character, you get a great comic book. Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader? is about the death of Batman, narrated by a disembodied Batman who is watching his own funeral. The story begins with Batman in a coffin and notable people in his life arriving to pay their last respects. Batman’s friends and allies sit side by side with his enemies and foes, and they each tell their story about the life and death of Batman. But their stories conflict and contradict each other. Batman dies in different ways depending on who is talking. Batman slowly comes to realize that he is having a near death experience, and that’s not even the main twist. This is a very important Batman comic, and a very short read. There’s no excuse for not reading it, especially if you consider yourself a Batman fan. The trade paperback even includes a few other short Batman comics as a bonus. Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader? isn’t the best Batman Comic of all time, but I would put it somewhere in the top twenty.

Critically Rated at 13/17

Written, Rated, and Reviewed by Brendan H. Young

Leave a comment

Filed under Entertainment

Daredevil (shitty film)

Daredevil is a pretty awesome comic book character. It just didn’t translate to the big screen. Mark Steven Johnson (Simon Birch, Ghost Rider) directs Ben Affleck in this jumbled and diluted tale of Matt Murdock, a blind lawyer by day and a masked vigilante by night. Daredevil fights crime in Hell’s Kitchen in New York City, righting wrongs, beating up bad guys, and kicking ass even though he can’t see anything. In this movie he meets Kingpin (Michael Clarke Duncan) and Bullseye (Colin Farrell), two of his main rivals in the comics. He also meets Elektra (Jennifer Garner), his sometimes ally, occasional foe, and passionate lover.

Daredevil Movie Poster

The movie begins with the origin of Daredevil. A young Matt Murdock is living with his dad, the aging boxer Jack “The Devil” Murdock. Being an aging boxer doesn’t pay the bills, so Jack has to work as a mob enforcer. Matt runs away and gets in a freak accident with some chemicals and loses his sight. His other senses become heightened and he starts honing his abilities. The mobsters kill his dad and Matt Murdock becomes Daredevil.

Matt Murdock meets Electra and the two of them have a romantic friendly fight and decide to hang out. Her dad is a criminal with ties to a shady new crime boss known as Kingpin. Kingpin doesn’t like Elektra’s daddy anymore and hires a deadly hit man named Bullseye to kill him. Daredevil tries to prevent the hit, but doesn’t succeed and Elektra thinks that Daredevil killed her dad.

A reporter named Ben Urich (Joe Pantoliano) has been investigating Daredevil and discovers his true identity. Rather that trying to publish a story, he helps Daredevil out and tells him that Bullseye is going after Elektra. He goes to help Elektra, but she kicks his ass instead and finds out his true identity and realizes that he didn’t kill her dad. She then goes after Bullseye herself, but she dies.

Matt fights Bullseye and defeats him and goes after Kingpin. He gets his ass beat for a while, but ultimately prevails and Kingpin goes to jail. There’s a few hints that Elektra might be alive, and one of the final scenes show that Bullseye is recovering in the hospital and it sets things up for a sequel that will never come to be.

Daredevil is a great comic book character… comic book, not film. Daredevil is blind, but the comics can depict Matt’s emotions show his fears, his thoughts, and his inner turmoil. Movies rely on pictures to tell stories. If your main character is a blind guy, there is no way to visually tell his story and that’s one of the areas where this movie fails. Daredevil’s world is darkness, and movies require light so that you can see what is happening. The two ideas clash and can’t coexist.

Jon Favreau plays Matt’s friend and business partner Foggy Nelson. You can tell that he is just taking notes on making a movie about a second-rate Marvel hero. And he did a great job because Iron Man kicks ass and Daredevil sucks.

This movie is slow. It is dull.  A bunch of things happen but nothing stands out. The worst part about this movie is that it makes Daredevil seem lame so newcomers wouldn’t want to read the comics. And you can’t blame them. This movie destroys Daredevil, Elektra, and Kingpin. Colin Farrell’s Bullseye is the least intimidating and most absurd comic book villain ever… even Jim Carrey as the Riddler is more frightening. Watch this movie if you want, just be aware that it disrespects the source material.

Critically Rated at 6/17

Leave a comment

Filed under Entertainment