Tag Archives: brad pitt

World War Z (film)

World War Z is a 2013 zombie flick based on the book written by Max Brooks. Marc Forster (Monster’s Ball, Quantum of Solace) directs and Brad Pitt stars as Gerry Lane, a former UN investigator who is called back into action to stop a zombie outbreak. These aren’t slow-moving Romero or Walking Dead zombies. These are 28 Days Later and 2003’s Dawn of the Dead zombies. They are fast and vicious, which leads to explosive action scenes. One zombie in the midst of a crowded area causes complete chaos. It’s almost impossible to escape. But Gerry Lane always finds a way to survive because he’s smart, calm under pressure, and he’s played by Brad Pitt and they need him for the sequel.

The basic plot is simple. There is a zombie pandemic and Gerry Lane must find the source in order to find a cure. He goes all over the world, from Philadelphia to Newark to South Korea to Jerusalem to Cardiff. It’s pretty easy to travel the world during the zombie apocalypse if you have UN connections apparently. He doesn’t find a cure but he finds a temporary solution, and the movie ends with a glimmer of hope for survivors around the globe.

World War Z made $540,007,876 at the box office, making it the highest-grossing zombie movie of all time. The filmmakers cited The Bourne Identity as an influence and you can see glimmers of it. The violence is gritty and realistic for the most part, despite using a lot of CG zombies that appear cartoonish at times. I never read the book so I can’t compare the two, but I enjoyed the movie. It was entertaining, had some good political points, and a lot of solid action scenes that keep you engaged. It’s a satisfying zombie movie, but it doesn’t bring anything original to the genre. You get infected if you get bit (unless you perform a quick amputation), the zombies die if you shoot them in the head, there are ways to make yourself invisible to the zombies, and the living are just as dangerous as the dead. Been there, done that.

Critically Rated at 13/17

Written, Rated, and Reviewed by Brendan H. Young

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Inglourious Basterds

Inglourious Basterds is Quentin Tarantino’s seventh film and an abomination of spelling. It’s your basic World War II fairy tale, taking place in an alternate timeline. The basic plot involves a Jewish-French chick and a ragtag group of soldiers trying to kill Hitler. And everyone has snazzy dialog because it’s a Tarantino movie.

Brad Pitt plays Lieutenant Aldo Raine, the leader of the Jewish-American “Basterds.” The Basterds enjoy spending their time killing and scalping Nazis. One of their main targets is Hans Landa (Christoph Waltz), a.k.a. the “Jew Hunter.” Landa is a formidable foe. His job is to track down Jews and he does his job well and without mercy. He’s a master of languages and is cunning and diabolical. His only mistake was letting the young Shosanna Dreyfus (Mélanie Laurent) escape from his clutches.

Shosanna goes on to change her name to Emmanuelle Mimieux and takes over a small cinema. One day she gets the opportunity to host a Nazi movie premiere that will be attended by the Nazi elite, including Hitler. She decides to use the opportunity to kill him. The Basterds also have a plan to kill Hitler. The result is rather explosive when two Hitler assassination plots merge in a Tarantino movie.

The best thing about the movie was casting Christoph Waltz as Hans Landa. He steals every scene; it doesn’t matter whether or not he is speaking English, German, French or Italian. You hate the guy and you like hating the guy. It makes it really satisfying when Aldo carves a swastika in his head. The worst thing about this movie is all the foreign languages resulting in a whole lot of subtitles. I don’t mind subtitles most of the time, but sometimes I just want to watch a movie without reading.

Inglourious Basterds is a good film. But it’s not one of Tarantino’s best. Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction, and the Kill Bill saga are better. Inglourious Basterds is too ambitious with too many plot holes. For instance, Aldo’s plan never would have worked if Landa didn’t have a secret agenda. All in all, this is a solid film and is required viewing if you’re a Tarantino fan.

Critically Rated at 13/17

Written, Rated, and Reviewed by Brendan H. Young

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